Community Development & Economic Impact

Blog Post
Posted October 28, 2011
WE’RE #1! WE’RE #1! Please excuse the excitement but this is a pretty cool deal. According to Travel and Leisure Magazine‘s America’s Favorite Cities survey 2011, Philadelphia is the best city in the nation for culture. In addition, Philadelphia was also rated as No. 3 city for “Food, Drink and Restaurants,” #1 for “Sports-Crazed” and a top-five city for shopping.
Blog Post
Posted October 26, 2011
Charities are protesting Congressional plans to gradually phase out the discounts they receive for mail appeals and other materials. Today nonprofits pay 26 percent less, on average, than businesses to send direct-mail solicitations and other communications to supporters. Those mailings are important for many big groups; while electronic appeals have taken off in recent years, few large nonprofits have found anything as effective for fund raising as direct mail.
Blog Post
Posted October 25, 2011
As more and more murals are being created on walls and other public spaces throughout Philadelphia, its international reputation as “The City of Murals” is becoming more and more impressive. You’ll know why the City of Brotherly Love has earned this title when you gaze in wonder at some of the awesome outdoor art enhancing its many diverse neighborhoods.
Blog Post
Posted October 25, 2011
Days are colder. Nights are longer. The tomatoes are gone and the flowers are browning. It's a bittersweet time for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society is removing a temporary garden nestled among downtown Philadelphia office buildings for good.
Blog Post
Posted October 20, 2011
The Mural Arts Program has launched a restoration fund, which will be used to maintain the more than 3,000 murals in Philadelphia. But it might not save a beloved wall in South Philadelphia.
Blog Post
Posted October 18, 2011
Since the city dubbed a 3.5-mile stretch of Broad Street the Avenue of the Arts in 1993, most of the action has happened south of City Hall. With the addition of the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts and the Suzanne Roberts Theatre, South Broad has lived up to its reputation as the city's cultural heart. The northern half of the arts district, from City Hall to Glenwood Avenue, has always been a harder sell. It's pockmarked with vacant lots, and the derelict Divine Lorraine Hotel at Ridge and Fairmount Avenues stands like a glaring symbol of blight. But in the past year, major projects have opened, and more than $500 million in new development is planned for the stretch of North Broad from City Hall to Temple University.
Blog Post
Posted October 13, 2011
Philadelphia's creative movers and shakers have been outed. The community organization Leadership Philadelphia identified 76 Creative Connectors through an online nomination and voting process.
Professional Development Event
Posted October 13, 2011

Pennsylvania’s political and philanthropic leaders will gather on Saturday evening, October 15 at Devereux’s 13th annual Gala to honor Thomas A. "Buck" Riley, Jr., founder of the law firm Riley, Riper, Hollin and Colagreco, with the 2011 Cheryl & Howard Hassman Devereux Leadership Award.

More than 450 people are expected to attend the Gala at the Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue Ballroom from 6:30 PM – 12:00 AM. All proceeds will benefit Devereux and its mission to provide innovative, quality care to the 4,700 children and adults annually served in southeast Pennsylvania.

Blog Post
Posted October 13, 2011
A new type of company intended to put social goals ahead of making profits is taking root around the country, as more states adopt laws to bridge the divide between nonprofits and businesses.
Blog Post
Posted October 12, 2011
On October 4th more than 70 people who live or work in Montgomery County gathered at the Ambler Theater to learn about Creative Montco, a cultural planning initiative for the county.
Blog Post
Posted October 11, 2011
Arts journalism nationwide has taken a beating during the recession, but a group of Charlotte media outlets including the Observer hopes to help reverse the trend with the aid of a $20,000 grant announced Monday. The project is one of five across the United States being backed by the National Endowment for the Arts and John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. The projects are finalists in the Knight/NEA Community Arts Journalism Challenge, which is looking for ways to use technology "to reach new audiences and ... engage people in new ways," said the foundation's vice president, Dennis Scholl, on Monday.
Blog Post
Posted October 11, 2011
This fall, 13 vacant windows and buildings along Lancaster Avenue in the Powelton section have been transformed by art. The display, paid for in part by a $30,000 city grant, will remain until Nov. 30.
Blog Post
Posted October 10, 2011
President Obama’s plan to fund his $447 billion jobs-stimulus bill by limiting tax breaks for wealthier people is getting a wary reception from arts organizations, which fear that the proposal could cut into already diminishing donations to museums, symphonies, ballets and other groups.
Blog Post
Posted October 7, 2011
It's no secret that the recession has been hard on the nation's cultural sector. Studies such as the National Endowment for the Arts' Survey of Public Participation in the Arts, Americans for the Arts' National Arts Index, and the James Irvine Foundation's California's Arts and Cultural Ecology report have all documented downward trends in attendance.
Blog Post
Posted October 7, 2011
It's taken a year. And it's been a valuable learning experience for all concerned. It's the project that led to the current exhibit "C3: Create, Connect, Collect" at Main Line Art Center, now celebrating its 75th anniversary. Featured is the full slate of 37 artist participants who began this initiative, nine of whom were commissioned through this project to make 11 pieces of art now displayed. These works are shown front and center, accompanied by the work of quite a few very worthy artists passed over in this first go-round.
Blog Post
Posted October 7, 2011
The Barnes Foundation collection in Lower Merion, Pa., one of the most illustrious and distinctive art displays in the world, has received what may be a decisive legal green light for its hotly disputed transfer to a new museum under construction five miles away in downtown Philadelphia.
Blog Post
Posted October 6, 2011
This past Saturday evening, hundreds of art lovers gathered at Lenfest Plaza—the new outdoor courtyard at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA)—to gaze upwards and witness the inaugural lighting of Paint Torch, a 51-foot tall sculpture of a paint brush standing on its end (at a 60 degree angle) with its paint-covered bristles ready to stroke the endless atmospheric canvas above Broad and Cherry Streets.
Blog Post
Posted October 3, 2011
The Philadelphia Orchestra Association is seeking a loan to help fund operations through the end of its bankruptcy case, and has applied to U.S. Bankruptcy Court for permission to assume $3.1 million in debt to pay operating costs, including salaries and vendor bills.
Blog Post
Posted October 3, 2011
Donors to arts groups tend to be compelled to give after making frequent visits and forging deep connections, but Nicholas Karabots hadn't been to the Franklin Institute in decades when, several months ago, he accepted an invitation to stop in. Karabots felt a deep connection; he himself was once an inner-city kid - "a bad kid," said the former South Bronx gang member - which informs his philanthropic decisions to this day. Relatively quickly, he and his wife, Athena, decided to give the Franklin Institute $10 million.
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